Can you install 7 with external DVD drive on laptop? .

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Can you install 7 with external DVD drive on laptop? . dvd shrink portable italianodaonei said:I only have a laptop with no CD/DVD media drive and only have an external DVD drive which connects with a USB. Is it possible to still install Microsoft 7 on my laptop? I would like to partition my drive and dual boot with my Vista, but was wondering whether it was possible to boot from my external drive through the USB.Thank you!yes and no. depends on your board and bios. only way to find out really is to try. plug in your drive, go into your bios and see if it shows up as a bootable device.daonei said:I only have a laptop with no CD/DVD media drive and only have an external DVD drive which connects with a USB. Is it possible to still install Microsoft 7 on my laptop? I would like to partition my drive and dual boot with my Vista, but was wondering whether it was possible to boot from my external drive through the USB.Thank you!yes and no. depends on your board and bios. only way to find out really is to try. plug in your drive, go into your bios and see if it shows up as a bootable device.Agreed on this. Well if you try to boot your laptop search for something like press del for setup or something related to that. I dont know hou does your bios look like but look for something related to USB support for the enabling of USB. Look for the First boot device or something related to that term then select boot from USB cd/dvd. I hope it helps... If you dont find the USB support then I think it will not work...RichardCarey Frisch said:Installing any Microsoft Windows operating system on an external hard drive is not supported.Windows operating systems are designed for installation on internal drives only. Carey Frisch MVPFunny, but I installed with external drive (SATA/USB connection) because for some reason, the DVD image disc would stop early on (in a new internal drive) with the message that it was missing some files and could not proceed. This was with both a 64 bit and a 32 bit installation.The external drive worked just fine (it appears as a bootable device in the BIOS). Installation completed and Windows 7 came up OK.Hi Daonei - sorry if I blinded you with command line commands.It sounds as though the simplest approach for you is to create a DVD from the ISO file that you downloaded. The trick here is to understand that the ISO file is a complete image of the DVD and not to end up with a disc with one file on it ending in .iso (most of us have done that when we're getting used to new CD/DVD burning tools).Most CD/DVD-writing programs will let you create a disc from an image - there are many tools that will do the job well but I would suggest searching for something called ImgBurn (there is an associated guide on writing an image file to disk). Alternatively, if you can find someone who already has Windows 7 installed, they you should be able to right-click on the .ISO file and choose the Burn disc image option from the menu.Once you have a DVD image with the Windows 7 beta on it, you should be able to boot your system from your external USB drive (if your BIOS supports this and the boot order is set to allow it) and run the installer.RJ Dudley's approach is a good one and avoids having to create a physical disc but is slightly more technical and you described yourself as a complete novice (I'm not familiar with the software he recommends but this link should help).Good luck, MarkMark Wilson (MVP Virtual Machine) - Super Food: Amazon.co.uk: Jamie Oliver: 9780718181239: Books .


Can you install 7 with external DVD drive on laptop? . dvd shrink portable italiano'Jamie Oliver is great - I'd put him in charge of the country' Guardian'Packed with vitamins, bursting with flavour: irresistible new recipes from Jamie Oliver' Sunday TimesJamie's Everyday Super Food makes eating well exciting, delicious, easy and fun.No matter how busy you are, you'll find that healthy eating the Jamie way is both straightforward and achievable, making it super easy to choose exactly the kind of meals that suit you.The book is divided into breakfasts (up to 400 calories), lunches (up to 600 calories) and dinners (up to 600 calories), and every tasty meal is nutritionally balanced so that any combination over the day will bring you in under your recommended daily allowance of calories (2000 women/2,500 men), allowing you to enjoy snacks and drinks on the side.'The healthy recipes that helped Jamie lose two stone' Sunday TimesYou can eat Smoothie Pancakes with Berries, Banana, Yoghurt and Nuts for breakfast, Tasty Fish Tacos with Game-Changing Kiwi, Lime and Chilli Salsa for lunch and Griddled Steak and Peppers with Herby-Jewelled Tabbouleh Rice for dinner, and still be healthy! Whether you dip in and out of it, eat from the book Monday to Friday or use it faithfully every day for a month, it's totally up to you.'Our failsafe foodie of choice' Sunday TimesIn Everyday Super Food, Jamie's done all the hard work for you - all you need to do is choose a delicious recipe, cook it up and, most importantly, enjoy it.Every meal in this book is a good choice and will bring you a step closer to a healthier, happier you.About the AuthorJamie Oliver started cooking at his parents' pub, The Cricketers, in Clavering, Essex, at the age of eight. After leaving school he began a career as a chef that took him to the River Café, where he was famously spotted by a television production company.His television and publishing career began in 1999 with The Naked Chef series. Since then he has set up Fifteen restaurant in London, changed school dinners in the UK and revolutionized home cooking. His charity, The Jamie Oliver Foundation, seeks to improve people's lives through food.He writes for publications in the UK and around the world, including his own Jamie Magazine. Jamie lives in London and Essex with his wife Jools and their children.I am a big fan of Jamie Oliver and I was so pleased to hear the premise of this new book was around super foods and balanced eating not low calorie foods but making nutritionally balanced meals that will still bring you in under your recommended calories for the day. Perfect.I have posted a full RECIPE LIST at the end of this review for those wondering what kind of recipes are in the book.I have to start this review with a summary in that I really do love this book, it’s a wonderful addition to my (growing) collection of Jamie’s books, plus I know that I should be eating a bit better and this book really has sincerely given me a fresh burst of inspiration… I made one of the best pasta dishes I’ve had in a long time from this book (Skinny Carbonara)... without cream.Before actually trying it I wasn't sure if I would be ok with replacing the cream in my carbonara with natural yoghurt (and a few other changes), but honestly it was an absolute dream, the skinny carbonara tasted fresh and light and was still filling (thanks to the whole wheat pasta). You can tell these recipes are really well researched and thought through but it tasted so good too!Unlike Jamie's other books I think this one may have a very slightly narrower appeal all the recipes look very tasty indeed but there are some, my parents for example, who are very traditional shall we say, and wouldn't dream of blitzing up dates and mixing them with spices to make 'energy balls', or taking cream out of pasta dishes for that matter! But they do love all of Jamie's other books. Personally I love this book as it's about making tasty and balanced meals and it's packed full of beautiful pictures too. Read more ›My father is a retired Army chef, with a life-long passion for cooking. He's 78 years old now and still gets more pleasure from creating culinary delights than anything else. When I was a boy, he didn't want me to go into the catering trade like him, he wanted me to become a lawyer, and I ended up as a partner in a law firm. Cooking didn't grab my fancy until my daughter was born 13 years ago, and these days spending time with my daughter in the kitchen is one of my greatest pleasures.I'm a big fan of Jamie Oliver. I still remember the first time I ever came across one of his recipes, bashed Maltesers on vanilla ice cream. So simple but genius...Everyday Super Food is a very fine recipe book. It's divided into breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks and drinks sections. It opens with Jamie's basic philosophy about food, with food as something not only to feed and nourish you, but as a medicine.The breakfast section includes delights like poached egg with smashed avocado and seeded toast, smoothie pancakes with berries, banana, yoghurt and nuts, black rice pudding (the first breakfast recipe I've tried from this book and it's deliriously yummy), porridge bars, numerous takes on scrambled eggs, sweet potato muffins, Earl Grey banana bread, and the one my daughter and I are going to have a crack at next, berry pocket eggy bread with pistachios, yoghurt, honey and cinnamon.The lunch section includes numerous different salads (the orange salad looks especially scrumptious), portable jam jar salads (which look amazing), chicken and garlic bread kebabs, wholewheat spaghetti, seared tuna with Sicilian couscous, veg omelette with chilli salsa, my Russian salad golden paprika chicken (my girlfriend's Ukrainian and I'm hoping that she'll make this next week!), and much more besides. Read more › 5 CommentsWas this review helpful to you?Yes NoSending feedback...A nice looking book with lots of colour photos. You will need to stock up on nuts, seeds.pulses,rice, honey , herbs and the like as most recipes contain these to a certain degree. Jamie also uses a lot of fresh ingredients and so called super foods. At first glance some of the recipes didnt look as though they were what I would normally cook but as I read through them I could easily adapt and they look so tasty I now am looking forward to trying some of them.Every recipe has all the nutritional, fat and calorific values at the bottom of each page.The book is divided into, introduction, breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks.and drinks.In the back of the book Jamie has written about, the balanced plate,fruit and veg, carbs, dairy, drinking water, alcohol, organic food, shopping, sleep,and do. you want to live to be a hundred?Some of the recipes are:Granola dustmagic poached egg on toastsmoothie pancakesrye soda breadporridge bars with nuts seeds fruit and spicesseveral ways with scrambled egg.sweet potato muffins, chilli,cheese and herbssuper protein loaf with loads of toppings ideasearl grey banana bread griddled peaches, yogurt and nutsjam jar saladshot smoked trout,green. lentils, fresh tomato saucechicken garlic bread kebabs, blood orange, spinach and fetasquash it veg sandwich, houmous, avocado and cottage cheeseseared golden chicken, mint sauce and spring veg festsuper squash lasagna, spinach, cottage cheese and seedsvegi ramen, walnut miso, kimchee and fried eggscrispy sea bass, pea, mint and asparagus mashginger chicken penicillin, brown rice and crunchy veg sauceshomemade houmoushomemade nut buttersenergy balls,teas and drinksfro yo fun fruit, yogurt, nuts and seeds.CommentWas this review helpful to you?Yes NoSending feedback...

SLV-R1000 Crystal Clear... Oh yea? - Digital Video Forums .


Can you install 7 with external DVD drive on laptop? . dvd shrink portable italianoFirst off....a VHS, super or regular, only has a maximum of up to 400 lines of resolution, and in analog.Second....it also depends on the type of tape you are using. Normal cheap VHS tape that sells for 99 cents per T-160 barely has any frequency response from the tape to provide correct color much less clarity in luminance.High bias VHS can give a little bit more cleaner images and better color. But again there is that up to 400 lines of resolution cap.Metal particle VHS tape is the best your gonna find, and does have the frequency response from the tape to provide more than adequate color depth and luminance clarity. But there is still the 400 lines of resolution limit.Third.....are you recording in the super duper mega extended speed? Thats the slowest speed the VCR can run. Definately not going to get clean recordings whatsoever.Last but not least....Fourth.....what is the source that you are recording?

Is it of the purest, cleanest quality? It will have to be if you want a VHS recording to look anything exactly like the source looks, or the results are going to be worse than the original.All late model VCR's use the 19 micron video heads. These heads provide the best possible transfer of the magnetic fields produced by the recording heads and onto the tape dvd shrink portable italiano. They also provide the best possible pick-up of the recorded magnetic signal for the best possible playback quality.Keep in mind also, that older VHS tapes, even those that are store bought or direct from the movie distributor, were not recorded on machines with the 19 micron heads or digital filters that are found in the later machines. Those tapes will look fuzzy, grainy, and just plain icky.It amazes me that VHS held on to and won the format war when comparing VHS to Beta and Super Beta. Beta out performed and still does out perform even S-VHS, and Beta/Super Beta didnt need 19 micron heads either.IMO, what should have happend is a recordable 12 video disc format should have been developed.

Problem was the 12 size of the disc. Plus the speeds required to even come close to 200 lines of resolution on a 12 disc would have to be so fast that the disc itself would be in jeapordy of flying apart inside the machine.....a very LOUD crash!Hope you do eventually find the right combination of proper tape and machine to get the results your looking for.(DV-D8-DVD-DHDT and the new Blu-Ray-R, are the only formats you can expect to get high resolution recordings from. And even with these, the source material must be as clean and clear as possible.)__________________LesEssential progs - [PgcEdit] [VobBlanker] [MenuShrink] [IfoEdit] [Muxman] [DVD Remake Pro] [DVD Rebuilder] [BeSweet] [Media Player Classic] [DVDSubEdit] [ImgBurn]Media and Burning - [Golden Rules of Burning] [Media quality] [Fix your DMA] [Update your Firmware] [What's my Media ID Code?] [How to test your disc][What's bitsetting?] [Burn dual layer disks safely] [Why not to burn with Ner0] [Interpret Ner0's burn errors] [Got bad playback?] [Burner/Media compatibility]Cool Techniques - [2COOL's guides] [Clean your DVD] [Join a flipper] [Split into 2 DVDs] [Save heaps of Mb] [How to mock strip] [Cool Insert Clips]Real useful info - [FAQ INDEX] [Compression explained] [Logical Remapping of Enabled Streams] [DVD-Replica] [Fantastic info on DVDs]You should only use genuine Verbatim or Taiyo Yuden media. Many thanks to www.pcx.com.au for their supply and great service.Explore the sites and the programs - there's a gold mine of information in themDon't forget to play the Digital Digest Quiz!!! (Click here)Quote:It amazes me that VHS held on to and won the format war when comparing VHS to Beta and Super Beta. Beta out performed and still does out perform even S-VHS, and Beta/Super Beta didnt need 19 micron heads either.@ RF Beta was broadcast quality while VHS doesn't even come close but do you think that VHS won it strictly based on price? Like anything else if the consumer isn't buying, you have to do one of two things, quit selling or bring your price down to what the consumer will pay. VHS did that we all know how you know who hates to do anything that might help the consumer out. I mean the consumer could still watch their movies just not the quality of Beta obviously most of them didn't care, they just wanted to be entertained at a decent cost.@ RF Beta was broadcast quality while VHS doesn't even come close but do you think that VHS won it strictly based on price?Hi soup!Well my first job was chief engineer for a 316 kilowatt VHF Ch 7 television station.

This was back in 1976. The good ol days of quad and u-matic. Most definately I know Beta had superior performance that closely matched broadcast specs. Close, but not quite. It was more of a match to the u-matic format, or more commonly refered to as the 3/4 format. There were two machines that had full 525 lines of resolution. The 2 inch quad head format (open reel) and the C format (1 inch open reel).VHS pricing of the tapes themselves had nothing to do with the format becoming the mainstay in the home video market. I can tell you what did make it become the mainstay of the format wars.

Two things contributed to its success.1. The price of the VCR. A high end VHS unit was considerably cheaper than its Beta counterpart. Aprox. $300.00 difference. The average price of a high end VHS machine was around 1,200.00, and that was not a hi-fi unit. A Beta machine was around 2,500.00 and up, and the Beta did have stereo audio.2. The marketing itself, ie advertising and promotion.

The movie industry along with the movie rental industry focused on the VHS format because of the purchasing trend by the consumer to the VHS format. This was further enhanced by the price of a home video camera system. The Beta system again was considerably expensive and boasted a 3 piece setup. Cumbersome and too much to haul around, no so portable. The VHS system had 1, the camera with the on-board VHS deck. Large and somewhat heavy when the battery was put into the camera, but still better than hauling 2 or more units with straps haning from your shoulders.Like anything else if the consumer isn't buying, you have to do one of two things, quit selling or bring your price down to what the consumer will pay.

VHS did that we all know how you know who hates to do anything that might help the consumer out.

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I mean the consumer could still watch their movies just not the quality of Beta obviously most of them didn't care, they just wanted to be entertained at a decent cost.This is very true. It is the same today, people want a good deal. And there is not a thing wrong with that. However, what that has done is bring the value of the service industry and the service technicians skill value right down the toilet with the cheap prices.When a consumer brings to a repair shop some 40 dollar DVD player, it surprises the customer that it cannot be fixed for less than 80 dollars, and they walk away highly confused as to why it is more expensive to fix than it cost brand new to purchase it.The mass marketing of an item is also a contributing factor to cheap prices on what most would think are valuable items with a high re-sale value. However it is opposite.

The item that cost 40 dollars at a wally world store instantly depreciates in value the second it leaves the store, and even more once it is removed from its box.One can example this by taking one of those cheap DVD players to a pawn shop, even if it is still in its box shrink wrapped. See what the pawn shop will give for it. Aprox 1/3 the value of it brand new dvd shrink portable ita. Maybe a little higher in some places, and maybe lower.But the poor service technician who spent years going to school and spent tons of tuition money to earn that degree and trying to support a family and house payment and replace worn out tires on the old betsy beat up truck has to make it on his/her now depreciated value skill. His/her cost of living does not get cheap along side with the cheap prices. The repair shop also must face this de-valued industry when having to make overhead costs, payroll, insurance, office supplies, inventory control, accounting and legal services plus the big one....taxes.It is almost impossible for an average repair shop to even keep the doors open when faced with a ton of cheap items that can be replaced more easily than to fix it.

When items can be replaced because of the cheap price to buy a new one vs repairing, it forces the repair industry to go through layoffs, reduced wages and sometimes going out of buisness. Anyone wonder why most service shops with the exception of major chain stores like Sears, no longer do in-home service and free estimates?They cannot afford it. Why? Cheap retail pricing.The industry back in the 70's when the VHS format hit the consumer market was a booming industry, often exceeding other major industries. Costs were also considerably cheaper for the repair shop owner, add the cost of living back then balanced out with the wages of those years.

And it was not cheap to simply replace a 1,200.00 VCR but it was economical to repair it for 300.00. Multiply that by about 10 a day, and that shop is making a good profit line, and the technician is making a very good wage and can buy a new truck!The whole thing is tied together like links on a chain. Where one link goes, all the others must follow that same path or the chain breaks. And believe me, the repair industry is broken.Most consumers of that time did not know what hi-fi was, did not know the difference between a 5.99 VHS tape vs a 19.99 VHS tape. All they knew was the price, and the 5.99 blank was more attractive to the wallet than the 19.99 blank. Movies were also expensive too, which is why there was a sudden surge and apperance of movie rental buisnesses.

They too followed the majority purchasing power, and is why the VHS format lasted so long even after the 12 LaserDisc hit the market. Beta began to come down in pricing to match VHS, both media and machine so that the format could recover from lost sales.All in all, the price did have some effect on the consumer choice as well as the direction of what format would become the mainstay.And you are correct soup, that the majority market just wanted to watch movies at home and were not concerned with picture and sound detail. That is until stereo hi-fi units came along and the HQ process of pre-recorded tapes that vastly improved picture and sound, even on the older VCR's, the HQ process improved the old workhorse picture reproduction by about 20 percent.Finer shadow masks inside the CRT's of televisions that were introduced around the early 80's that used dynamic convergence circuitry gave us the semi-flat/semi-square picture tube. That vastly improved picture reproduction all by itself, giving finer sharpness and greater contrast without the washed out look. It also gave us a vast improvement in color. Digital tuners and IR remote controls that were incorporated into the tv and VCR's helped.However, the buff market, those who do look at specifications, features and functionality, pricing didnt matter much because specifications, adaptability and reproduction quality such as the Beta systems offered were the primary reason for spending the extra bucks.Some may be familiar with Sony's XBR logo which was used on Sony's high end televisoins.

Us engineers came up with a unique translation of those 3 letters.XBR, e Xtra Bucks Required! Of course this is not the official position of Sony.The buff market does not make the majority of the buying power in the consumer electronic industry or any other industry. The buff market is more of a special application section of the market, which is why high end gear is considerably expensive and sports more bells and whistles, and it was the same during the format wars of VHS and Beta, and that is why the VHS won that format war in the majority consumer market and the Beta won the hearts of the die hard high end market.In light of all of this, nothing can prevent change and improvement in technology, and with that it is inevitable that markets will change with it. It can go either way, benefit to the end users and service/manufacturing, or hurt the end users anticipated hopes of having high end results with cheap items, and run down the value of service/manufacturing by flooding the market with cheap items.Whew! A long post! Sorry bout that, just tons of information to try to cram into a nutshell!I cant wait for the replacement of DVD discs and no more mechanical nightmares or scratched discs.

The infamous memory stick!Once those hit 40Gb and higher we can eliminate the DVD disc and machine completely. The memory stick is already familiar to even the most laymen consumer, it does not need a machine, the stick is cross-unit compatiable with the various makers, access times is vastly faster than the DVD, very small in size, does not need any special equipment or cables to connect to play or record to, slips into the slot already built into LCD and Plasma tv's, is far more portable for things like I-Pod, it will not require a re-education of the consumer to use it, it will not require a re-engineering of tv's or engineering of a new play/record unit, and the biggest benefit....is scratch proof!!!There are some nifty concept prototyping going on here at the Sony Labs, lets just say that if the corporate mindset looks at this alternative closely as well as the movie/audio industry, we could see the replacement of all disc based media very soon, possibly see some introduction at a CES show as early as 2010.Those XBR's had an incredible picture. I still havve two 32' XBRs and a 27 XBR in storage just in case. Spec's aside I still theink those 32 XBR look better than 95% of the Plasma and LCD TV's out here. They were a money maker too. Those Tuners and the VIF had to rebuilt every couple of years and the TV owners loved those TV's so much they happily paid the price.

What other TV could you (or can you even!) tune-up every 2 years or so for 10 years and still have a fantastic picture. Like I said before those big Sony CRT WEGA's still have the best picture around, even if it takes 4 people to move them.I was confuse the VCR is great... there is no blurring it was just my UHF cable can't handle the detail I tried s-video and the picture is great.I wouldn't care about a neat VCR except for the fact I need it to transfer tapes to DV then to DVD and then it will be all over for the tape...I sent my SLV-r1000 to repair it for 75$ I paid about the same amount for it with the loading tape damage. I read your messages so is the BETA better? I always heard the BETA was an older competitor to VCRs so I deduced its image was worse then anything that's why I never bought one... Would a VHS tape play on a BETA? I wouldn't buy a BETA even if it gives me DVD quality since I don't have any beta tape I need to transfer.Oh one thing! has my SLV-r1000 better quality then any beta out there? you know this VCR has APC... just a curiosity...Those XBR's had an incredible picture. I still havve two 32' XBRs and a 27 XBR in storage just in case. Spec's aside I still theink those 32 XBR look better than 95% of the Plasma and LCD TV's out here.

They were a money maker too. Those Tuners and the VIF had to rebuilt every couple of years and the TV owners loved those TV's so much they happily paid the price. What other TV could you (or can you even!) tune-up every 2 years or so for 10 years and still have a fantastic picture. Like I said before those big Sony CRT WEGA's still have the best picture around, even if it takes 4 people to move them.These old TV's have better picture then newer plasmas?The Beta format worked much like the C-1 inch format. The tape wrapped around the video drum almost completely. The 1 inch C format would have the tape wrapped around the drum 99 percent of the circumferance of the head drum, the Beta was about 80 percent.

This means the video heads have more tape area to write/read, which translates to more information on the tape and hence, better video (greater resolution).The scan angle also played an important role in the Beta format. At almost near horizontal scan angle to tape angle, this gave each video head more tape surface to record.The VHS format only puts the tape at about 75 percent of the video drum, and the scan angle is considerably less horizontal. Both the Beta format and VHS format use the same width tape, 1/2 inch.The broadcast format U-Matic had the same tape to head drum contact percentage as the Beta format, about 80 percent and the scan angle was identical. The differences are: Beta tape speed was slower and used 1/2 inch wide tape, where as the U-Matic used 3/4 inch wide tape and the speed was equivilant to about 10 ips (inches per second). This gave both Beta and U-Matic a very close spec equivilant to the 1 C format and the 2 Quad Head format.Of course in recent years both VHS and the Beta format went to digital, that is the recorded information going to tape was in digital form, not analog. The Beta format continues to live on in the broadcast world known as Beta-SP, which sports both analog and digital capabilities. VHS went to the digital realm much later, but was overlooked by the DVD and DV formats, which are both pure digital.Most broadcast facilities dont even use tape anymore, they use an array of RAID platters (HD's) and DVD discs for program content and commercial playback. Some are even using the total HDR (Hard Disc Raid) systems for HDTV broadcasting.Now we all face the format wars again, with the HDTV differences between shows and stations, the Blu-Ray HD disc, and the never ending resolution debacle of 1080i vs 1080p and byond.

Seems that even in the world of 1's and 0's, variances are prevelant when there shouldnt be. Had the FCC decided on an absolute standard for HDTV, and mandated all stations broadcast HDTV in one specific format, we wouldnt be going through this resoltuion confusion....hey I made a neat little saying there! The Resolution Confusion!!!!

What is beta version?

Beta

Best Answer: 

The word "beta" comes from the Greek, for the second letter in the alphabet. The term "beta version," or "beta test," originated with early hardware tests for IBM computers, where the beta test was used to examine whether the hardware properly performed all its listed functions.
When a new product is created or upgraded, there are several stages in development before the product can be sold in the commercial marketplace. The first stage is the alpha stage, in which the product is tested by software testers within the company and debugged as necessary. A beta version is the name for the second stage of software testing, in which it is released for free or a reduced price to a group of users
The beta version of a software release is considered to be a preview. It has all the standard features, but is not yet ready for wide release or sale. During this point, the company will collect feedback from users about the product's usability — what they like and what should be changed — before the product's wide release. A beta version of a program can be either a closed beta, which is limited to a specific group of users, or an open beta, which is available for the general public to use.
Though beta version products will often have all the features available in the final version of the product, they generally have limited, if any, technical support available to users. However, many products will often remain in beta version for years, during which time they are used by a wide audience as if they were full versions of products.

Source(s):

Super Smash Bros. for Wii U Betting Beta StreamADay (Day 306): https://t.co/FdiFgDROEe

I liked a YouTube video from giivasunner https://t.co/bLxQ4kC228 Overworld Theme (Beta Mix) - New Super Mario Bros.

12 Tech trends of the future - kevin2kelly gets super beta in his keynote with a PACKED room. AskKevinKelly SXSW



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